2016-05-27

The Possessive Endings - Part II

As told in the las post, in Varga language, possession is given and shown by attaching suffixes to the noun. Suffix usage depends on vowel harmony, the amount of objets possessed, the person of the owner (I, you, their etc.) and if the noun ends with vowel or consonant.

PersonSuffixes
(for possession of multiple objects)
Meaning
Noun ends with
 vowel
Noun ends with
consonant
mi “I”~im~oim, ~eimmy (...)s
ti “you”~id~oid, ~eidyour (...)s
ö “he/she/it”~yi~ai, ~eihis/her/its (...)s
biz “we”~ink~oink, ~einkour (...)s
tiz “you (pl.)”~itok, ~itek~oitok, ~eitek your (...)s
ök “they”~yik~aik, ~eik their (...)s

Examples:
  • men “table”: meneim “my tables”, meneid “your tables”, menei “his/her tables”, meneink “our tables”, meneitek “your (pl.) tables”, meneik “ their tables”.
  • gal “mountain”: galoim, galoid, galai, galoink, galoitok, galaik.
  • (*) deti “family”: detím, detíd, detiyi, detínk, detítek, detiyik.
  • tomo “friend”: tomoim, tomoid, tomoyi, tomoink, tomoitok, tomoyik.

Use of the suffixes above is allowed for nouns in singular forms only.

(*) Sometimes, the final vowel of the noun and the first of the suffix are the same. In this case, don't put them together; instead, make them combine as follows: i + i = í.

Echo Stuart Garrard kay gitar apsoyi
That's Stuart Garrard and his guitar talents.

That's all for now.

2016-05-23

The Possessive Endings - Part I

Possession is given and shown by attaching suffixes to the noun. Suffix usage depends on vowel harmony, the amount of objets possessed, the person of the owner (I, you, their etc.) and if the noun ends with vowel or consonant.

PersonSuffixes
(for single possession)
Meaning
Noun ends with
 vowel
Noun ends with
consonant
mi “I”~m~om, ~emmy (...)
ti “you”~d~od, ~edyour (...)
ö “he/she/it”~ya, -ye~ya, -yehis/her/its (...)
biz “we”~nk~onk, ~enkour (...)
tiz “you (pl.)”~tok, ~tek~otok, ~itek your (...)
ök “they”~yuk~yuk their (...)

Examples:
  • men “table”: menem “my table”, mened “your table”, menye “his/her table”, menenk “our table”, menitek “your (pl.) table”, menyuk “ their table”.
  • gal “mountain”: galom, galod, galya, galonk, galotok, galyuk.
  • deti “family”: detim, detid, detiye, detink, detitek, detiyuk.
  • tomo “friend”: tomom, tomod, tomoya, tomonk, tomotok, tomoyuk.

Use of the suffixes above is allowed for nouns in singular forms only. The suffixes for the dual are ~laram, ~larad, ~lara, ~larank, ~lartok, ~laryuk.

Echo Mustafa kay utsolara
That's Mustafa and his two spouses.

That's all for now. Next post, the part deux of this hot shots hehe.

2016-05-08

Happy Mother's Day!

Happy Mother's Day!

In Varga, you can say: O Nanam, ogauna, Anam! (lit.: O Mommy, Good Feast, My Mom!). Gauna stands for feast, while the o- prefix is very known in Japanese. The O at the start is the vocative.

Better than any cliche, you would like say everything on your own love in your own worlds, like Juliana Santiago (daughter of Valdemiro Santiago) has done to her mother, Francileia. See the video:



The videoclip above is in Portuguese, both sound and lyrics. Unfortunately, I'd found not any English lyrics translate (not even in Portuguese). I typed the lyrics from the video subtitles. The lines below are just a part, the final part of the song.


Ana
Czikani ti da horbel dezirem
Uren tani tile
Ana
Keruamot tuje vautod
Nai
Tett rah gyam vanensenoyu
Ana
Nana
Tett havasoyu!

mãe
quero ter você sempre por perto
até quando Deus permitir
mãe
sempre aguardou o meu regresso
não
não quero mais de ti me separar
mãe
mamãe
eu te amo!

Tuje mett havasotyosz
mett sensetyesz
mett ticzetyesz
minek purasotyosz

sempre me amou
me educou
me ensinou
por mim orou

Ana
Tito vanauyu, vanudakasoyu
Ana
Tinek hedari mane dinem da mi
Nai
Tett rah gyam vanensenoyu
Ana
Mi
Tett havasoyu!
Mi sei anam
Havasoyu.

mãe
eu quero te encontrar e te abraçar
mãe
eu tenho tanta coisa pra te falar
não
não quero mais de ti me separar
mãe
eu
te amo!
minha linda mãe
te amo.

___________________________________
VOKABULAR:


ensenoda (v) : to be apart from, to make yourself apart from omeone or something
kerua, kerusa (n.) : the return, the "back home"


2016-05-06

TDT #6: Frozen - Let it Go

Finally! Frozen on our bag!




Kon yoruni galni yuku vaeil blazi
Mu ato bumi ni
Izoluan meoam
Reina da mi, sebluri

The snow glows white on the mountain tonight
Not a footprint to be seen
A kingdom of isolation
And it looks like I'm the queen


Mini kazemon konyasi kaz da nakeri
Mu kenjailsetyu, sora znati da

The wind is howling like this swirling storm inside
Couldn't keep it in, heaven knows I've tried


'Olinniyaboh mu', 'ollayaboh mu'
'Gi ko na ti, da tuje eienni'
'Absukuyaboh', 'iole', 'znole öknek'
Da, znayuk ök

Don't let them in, don't let them see
Be the good girl you always have to be
Conceal, don't feel, don't let them know
Well, now they know


Jiyuuna! Jiyuuna!
Mu mol kenjailseya da
Jiyuuna! Jiyuuna!
Sepkeru, doazula kay
Minek da feitinai logyuk
Ya na kazemon
L oya djam mett annoi

Let it go, let it go
Can't hold it back anymore
Let it go, let it go
Turn away and slam the door
I don't care what they're going to say
Let the storm rage on
The cold never bothered me anyway


Asobei zno da, enni bekisi dinetek
L mett domineyiki paurak da mu mol mett domineyik

It's funny how some distance makes everything seem small
And the fears that once controlled me can't get to me at all


Kenosoda mi ladanak ta da
Borepruda kay aucasuda
Güle, bözle, minek mu rulok
Jiyui

It's time to see what I can do
To test the limits and break through
No right, no wrong, no rules for me
I'm free


Jiyuuna! Jiyuuna!
Kazto sorato yokeeyemi
Jiyuuna! Jiyuuna!
Ti namuyuri mett gyam layosz
Kohi mi, kohi darah kay
Kazemon, orduboh

Let it go, let it go
I am one with the wind and sky
Let it go, let it go
You'll never see me cry
Here I stand and here I'll stay
Let the storm rage on


Maem z kaz b subumini trezu, kay
Saredce yukuuyiki paltekig b aruena sulu
Kay kol bir minanece da yugi czutig
Gyam eszkuuyom, kakou aszerni da

My power flurries through the air into the ground
My soul is spiraling in frozen fractals all around
And one thought crystallizes like an icy blast
I'm never going back, the past is in the past

 

Jiyuuna! Jiyuuna!
Biumares mi tatiyu rah
Jiyuuna! Jiyuuna!
An sei ko da mu mol!
Kohi mi, yomno fareni
Ya na kazemon
L oya djam mett annoi

Let it go, let it go
And I'll rise like the break of dawn
Let it go, let it go
That perfect girl is gone
Here I stand in the light of day
Let the storm rage on
The cold never bothered me anyway


_________________________________________________

VOKABULAR:

asobei (adj.) : funny
ato (n.) : mark. By the context, it means footprint.
gal (n.) : mountain
kazemon (n.) : storm
io (n.) : feelings
izolua (n.) : isolation
jailseda (v.) : to arrest
jiyui (adj.) : free
jiyuuna (n.) : freedom
meo (n.) : kingdom
nakeda (v.) : to scream, to cry out
ollinnida (v.) : to allow (someone) enter
ollada (v.) : to allow (someone) see
palte (n.) : fractal
reina (n.) : queen
trezuda (v.) : to flurry
tuje (disc. m.) : always
yoru / yor (n.) : night
zno (n.) : knowledge

2016-05-04

Do you like Chocolate?

Yes, I do! And more likely you too.

But... do you know how to say "I like chocolate" in Varga?


Firstly: adjectives can act like verbs.

Are da braunei czokolato. That's the maroon chocolate.
An czokolato da braunei. That chocolate['s color] [is] maroon. (Lit.: that chocolate da maroon).

For using adjectives like verbs, everything you need do is change word order (adjective goes to the end) and add the particle da right before it.

The past tense is quite simple. Just add deri instead of da.

L uammi kof. The warm coffee.
L kof da uammi. The coffee [is] warm.
An kof deri uammi. Nau da frodi. That coffee [was] warm. Now it's cold.

The desiderative is given by the particles na and neri, which respectively replaces da and deri.

As you have noticed, the adjective does not change at all.

But you didn't say how I can do "I like chocolate" !

You're right. So follow me.

To say "I like chocolate" or something else, you take the adjective suki "tasteful" and use it like above.

Minek czokolato da suki. I like chocolate.  (Lit.: To me, chocolate da tasteful)

Since adjectives don't change, you must specify who likes the thing. So you put the pronoun or the person's name or something alike. Don't forget to mark the person or pronoun with the dative suffix ~nak/~nek.

To say "I dislike...", the adjective is kirai "hateful":

Jyokoknak yasafu da kirai. Children dislike greenery.  (Lit.: To the children, greenery da hateful)
Minek zutin da kirai. I dislike stink

That's enough for now. 'Till the next one.

2016-05-02

The anger I feel of this world.

How to say this...

For sure, the anger I feel of this world. Or it would be "melancholy" ??


To say "of this world" in such context, use the ablative with the word koz -- literally, "because of". So you get koz kaeker "because of world" or, more specifically, koz kon kaeker "because of this world".

Solved this, it got easy. Engyo stands for "anger". For "melancholy", the term is quite looking: malankulia.

The phrases you would make:
  • Koz kon kaeker engyom. The anger I feel of this world. Lit.: "because [of] this world-ABL anger-POSS1SP"
  • Koz kon kaeker malankuliam. The melancholy I feel of this world. Lit.: "because [of] this world-ABL melancholy-POSS1SP"
You must use the possessive forms to specify from who is the anger/melancholy/something else -- unless you want it to mean "The anger because of this world".

Remember POSS1SP stands for Possessive, 1st Single Person (namely, the suffixes ~m, ~om ~em).